David Powers Walker1

M
David Powers Walker||p79.htm#i2419|Phillip Darington Walker||p81.htm#i2417|Mary Margaret Powers||p62.htm#i2418|Ernie C. Walker|b. 3 Aug 1898\nd. 18 Jul 1991|p79.htm#i2413|Magenta B. Parker|b. 8 Sep 1900\nd. 1975|p59.htm#i2414|||||||
FatherPhillip Darington Walker1
MotherMary Margaret Powers1
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Last Edited27 Mar 2007

Citations

  1. [S363] Phillip Walker, "Daniel Salathiel Renfro Walker."

Doris Walker1,2

F
Doris Walker||p79.htm#i1038|Reverend Doctor Carl Edgar Walker|b. 1 Apr 1914\nd. 27 Jan 2004|p78.htm#i1005|Waunita Alice Lormor|d. 1 Oct 2010|p50.htm#i1017|James A. Walker|b. 31 Aug 1874\nd. 5 Sep 1932|p79.htm#i175|Lulu B. Downing|b. 15 Dec 1875\nd. 19 Oct 1953|p20.htm#i964|||||||
FatherReverend Doctor Carl Edgar Walker b. 1 Apr 1914, d. 27 Jan 2004
MotherWaunita Alice Lormor d. 1 Oct 2010
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Thomas Downynge Descendants
     Doris Walker married Russell Wayne Britschgi on 6 May 1967.

Family

Russell Wayne Britschgi
Marriage*Doris Walker married Russell Wayne Britschgi on 6 May 1967. 
Last Edited2 Nov 2004

Citations

  1. [S10] Personal Statement of Ron Williams documented herein.
  2. [S228] Doris Walker-Britschgi, "Doris Walker-Britschgi message," e-mail to Ron Williams, 2005.

Doug Walker

M
Doug Walker||p79.htm#i1035|Reverend Doctor Daniel Downing Walker||p78.htm#i1003|Virginia Lovelady||p50.htm#i1033|James A. Walker|b. 31 Aug 1874\nd. 5 Sep 1932|p79.htm#i175|Lulu B. Downing|b. 15 Dec 1875\nd. 19 Oct 1953|p20.htm#i964|||||||
FatherReverend Doctor Daniel Downing Walker
MotherVirginia Lovelady
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Thomas Downynge Descendants
     Doug Walker married Charlene Payne.1 Doug Walker married Barbara Courtney.1

Family 1

Charlene Payne
Marriage*Doug Walker married Charlene Payne.1 
Children

Family 2

Barbara Courtney
Marriage*Doug Walker married Barbara Courtney.1 
Children
Last Edited30 Mar 2007

Citations

  1. [S170] Interview, Gerald Walker, 5 Jul 2004.

Edward B. Walker Jr.1,2,3,4,5

M, b. 7 September 1795, d. 9 April 1860
Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|unknown Walker||p81.htm#i2578||||Frederick Horn||p42.htm#i192|Jane Horn (married name)||p42.htm#i193|
FatherEdward B. Walker Sr. b. 1756, d. 26 Aug 1838
MotherJane Horn b. 1771, d. bt 1849 - 1851
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Taylor Vitti's ancestors
Gerald Walker's ancestors
Brendan Williams' Ancestors
      Edward B. Walker Jr. also went by the name of Neddie. He was born on 7 September 1795 at Hawkins, Sullivan, Tennessee, United States; Confusion over place of birth.
Bill Longmire says he may have been born in Sullivan Co. TN, which is where his parents apparently lived for a period following their marriage; however, there appears to be evidence that as a child, Neddie lived in Russell Co., VA.

Bill Longmire indicates that Mulberry Gap variously existed in Claiborne and Hancock County; parts of Claiborne Co. also became Union County.6,3 He lived after 17 September 1795 in at Rogersville, Hawkins, Tennessee, United States; Neddie's father moved to Rogersville after Revolutionary War service, a town that's in Hawkins County, hence that is a possible place of residence for the younger Edward as well.3 Heserved in the military on 13 November 1814 as in the Tennesee Militia

Evidence reveals that Neddie's rank was that of a private throughout his brief tenures.

He enlisted either at Blountsvillein Sullivan Co., or in Hawkins Co. We have copies of information about his military service, none of which seems to indicate that he saw actual combat.

Also, there's no evidence that he was part of Andrew Jackson's famous militia group in the Battle of New Orleans. His service was primarily with Capt. John Slatten's company of the TN militia.

Bill Longmire stated that Neddie might have been drafted from Hawkins County for his War of 1812 service.3,7 Heserved in the military on 13 November 1814 as Both Edward Walker, Jr., and his brother Joseph are known to have served in the War of 1812, and their brother William may have as well, although his service has not yet been proven.

The oldest sons of Edward B. Walker grew up just as the young nation itself started to grow up, and international events were developing that would draw the country into another war with Great Britain. Ned was eight when Thomas Jefferson's administration made the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 from Napoleon Bonaparte, who by then was emperor of France. Shortly thereafter, Napoleon provoked a war with Great Britain.

The United States was neutral at first and enjoyed the benefits of being the largest neutral shipping country. But in 1805, after the Battle of Trafalgar, Britain regained unchallenged control of the seas. Starting in 1806, Britain declared, though Orders of Council, that all ports controlled by the French were to be closed to all foreign shipping unless those ships first stopped at British ports; at those ports, the foreign ships, including American ones, would have to pay fees and obtain any necessary papers to continue on to their final ports. Napoleon responded by ordering that all ships entering British ports be seized.

American shipping interests and exporters were extremely concerned about the situation, but shipping was primarily an issue in the northern states. Southern farmers such as the Walkers exported nothing and would not have been affected directly.

But all Americans were concerned about the British practice of impressment; under British law, sailors could be kidnapped and forced to serve in the British Navy. While the official rules mandated that the impressed men be British subjects, thus excepting Americans by policy, impressment officials seldom worried about the nationality of the sailors they kidnapped. In fact, they often had stretchers to carry the men that they would knock unconscious with clubs before taking them to a ship. All told, about 6,000 American sailors were forced into service by Britain between 1808 and 1811, and many were killed or wounded. The American public was quite outraged at the practice.

These and other incidents on the high seas led Jefferson to ask Congress to pass the Embargo Act of 1807, which prohibited the export of all goods from the United States to any foreign country. This act affected northern interests far more than our southern ancestors who did not ship their goods overseas, but public outcry was so loud that Jefferson was actually worried that his government would not survive. The Embargo Act was repealed in early 1809 and replaced with the Non-Intercourse Act, which allowed the United States to trade with all countries except Britain and France. With that act set to expire in 1810, Congress passed Macon's Bill No. 2, which stipulated that if either Britain or France ended their shipping restrictions, the embargo would be reinstated against the country that continued its restrictions.

These sorts of issues, although sounding perhaps a bit dry to modern ears, were huge news at the time and likely were discussed among the older generations and the Walkers. The war in Europe and its impact on America constituted the main foreign news of the day, much like the World Wars would have done before the United States entered the wars officially.

In November 1810, Napoleon claimed that his decrees had been repealed, so an American embargo was once again placed on shipping with Great Britain. Britain felt the impact of the new embargo so strongly that it repealed its Orders in Council and allowed and allowed ships to proceed unmolested to French ports. However, two days later, the United States Congress declared War on Great Britain. Congress would not have had time to know about the repeal, and, given the atmosphere in Congress, the repeal would not have mattered.

The country was divided among those who wanted war with Britain, those who wanted war with France, and those who wanted no war. More Americans were of British heritage than French, and Napoleon was a dangerous aggressor in Europe, but many people still felt the sting of the Revolution and also had a special fondness for France because of France's help in the Revolution. A new Congress took power in 1811, and the cries for war grew louder. In a divided vote, Congress declared war on Great Britain on 18 June 1812; Tennessee's three congressmen in the House of Representatives all voted for war; the people in the West, which included Tennessee at the time, generally supported the war more than the merchants of New England, who had more to lose economically.

Although Tennessee gained its nickname as The Volunteer State during this war because of a large number of volunteers when war was declared, the vast majority of the men who served from Tennessee were drafted. Two months after the British Army burned Washington in August 1814 and a month after Frances Scott Key wrote the words to what would become the national anthem, both Ned and Joseph Walker were drafted to serve in the war. Ned was probably living on Bays Mountain in Hawkins County, but Joseph was drafted in Sullivan County

Both men served the same term, 13 November 1814 to 2 June 1815, with Ned serving under Captain John Slatton, Colonel Edwin Booth, in the Fifth Regiment of the East Tennessee militia. The Fifth Regiment was a division of the troops commanded by Major General William Carroll. Joseph was drafted in Sullivan County under Captain John Brock, Colonel Samuel Bayless. Although serving in different units, their experience appears to have been similar.
Map of key War of 1812 locations; from the Tennessee State Library and Archives Web site

Despite some claims otherwise, neither Ned's unit nor Joseph's unit appears to have been at the Battle of New Orleans under Andrew Jackson. Instead, they organized at Knoxville and marched to Ross' Landing and over Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga, to Fort Strother on the Coosa River in Alabama, and on to Mobile more than 500 miles away. A summary by the Tennessee State Library and Archives indicates that the soldiers walked the whole way, but, as General Carroll was known to carry men south on flat boats, at least part of the trip downstream may have been by boat.

The units did arrive in Mobile before the Battle of New Orleans. But while Andrew Jackson continued to plan the attack at New Orleans, he still assumed that the British would attack Mobile, and attacks were also possible by a faction of Native Americans known as the Red Sticks, a disaffected band of Creeks. Booth's regiment was left to protect the various forts around Mobile, and at least some of the troops probably were stationed at Camp Mandeville south of Mobile.

No major battles appear to have occurred in the area where Edward likely was. Whether there were smaller skirmishes with Native Americans or others is unknown. Fourteen out of the 104 men of his unit did not serve the complete term, so they presumably died in some manner or deserted. However, disease was rampant and usually killed more in these times than combat itself, and desertions were also common.

The Battle of New Orleans itself occurred on 8 January 1815. Much has been made of the fact that the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the war, had been signed the previous month on 24 December but news of the treaty had not yet reached the United States. While technically true, the United States did not actually ratify the treaty until mid-February, and war continued until then. However, the battle at New Orleans was the culminating battle. General Andrew Jackson had under his command some 7,000 regular soldiers, sailors, pirates, and French citizens, as well as militiamen from Louisiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee. In that battle, the British army of 8,000 seasoned veterans launched a frontal assault on entrenched Americans. In about thirty minutes, the British suffered about 2,000 casualties to the American's 71. This battle made a hero of Andrew Jackson and helped to later make him president.

Ned and Joseph most likely were discharged at Mobile after the war. They received pay for the full term at that time; for their service as a private, each was paid $53.33, which equates to $8 a month. Since the units were drawn from upper East Tennessee, they probably embarked with a large group of men for the trip home. Since upstream river travel seems unlikely, they quite possibly walked all the way home; even at a brisk pace, they likely did not arrive home until late summer at the earliest.7 He married Mahala Tussey, daughter of Jacob Tussey and Jane Shuff, in February 1817 at Sullivan, Tennessee, United States.3 It is assumed that Edward, Jr., and his older brother,Joseph, married Tussey sisters on the same day. Joseph married Mary; Edward chose Mahalia (Haley).3 Edward B. Walker Jr. married Sarah Crumly on 25 June 1848. Edward B. Walker Jr. died on 9 April 1860 at Mulberry Gap, Tennessee, United States, at age 64; Bill Longmire indicated that Mulberry Gap variously existed in Claiborne and Hancock County; parts of Claiborne Co. also became Union County.3 Edward Walker, Jr., commonly called Ned or Neddie, was born on a late summer Monday during George Washington's second term as president, on 7 September 1795. He was probably born in Sullivan County, Tennessee, either on Horse Creek not far from Jared's Branch of the South Fork of the Holston River or on Reedy Creek, which is on the riverfront of what is now downtown Kingsport. Evidence is scarce, however, as to his parents' exact whereabouts during these times, and alternately, but less likely, he may have been born in southwest Virginia somewhere in or around Russell County.

At the time Ned was born, Tennessee was not yet a state, although it became one less than a year later on 1 June 1796. When his father first settled the area, Virginia had given up most of its claims, and the area was considered part of North Carolina, at least by North Carolina; the State of Franklin was created by a group of settlers in Tennessee, but Congress never recognized it. By the time Ned was born, the State of Franklin had collapsed, and Congress had renamed the area to be the Territory South of the Ohio River, a designation to prepare Tennessee for statehood.

Ned was the third of what would be twelve children; he may have had a middle name as did some of his siblings, but no evidence has been found to show that he did. Although his father's middle initial was "B.", there is no particular evidence to suggest that Ned had the same middle name. Unlike today, children named for their parents often had different middle names.

Little is known of Ned's early childhood. He probably was not educated, or at least not educated very well as he was unable to sign his name in later life; his older siblings likewise could not write. Quite simply, when the older Walkers were of common school age, there were no schools whatsoever in Tennessee and few if any tutors anywhere in the area. Many of his younger siblings were educated, which probably reflects the growing availability of education in the new state. in 2010.7

Family 1

Mahala Tussey b. 1802, d. 28 Dec 1842
Marriage*He married Mahala Tussey, daughter of Jacob Tussey and Jane Shuff, in February 1817 at Sullivan, Tennessee, United States.3 
Children

Family 2

Sarah Crumly
Marriage*Edward B. Walker Jr. married Sarah Crumly on 25 June 1848. 
Last Edited10 Mar 2011

Citations

  1. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."
  2. [S13] Jim & Jane Walker, "Walker: Jim & Jane Walker Research."
  3. [S62] Rev. Robert Walker, "Bob Walker research."
  4. [S65] "Walker-Burns Research", Annie-Walker-Burns , to Rev. Robert Walker.
  5. [S66] Bill Longmire, "Walker: Bill Longmire research," e-mail message from Bill Longmire to Rev. Robert Walker.
  6. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.
  7. [S377] Genealogy of Edward B. Walker, online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/…

Edward B. Walker Sr.1

M, b. 1756, d. 26 August 1838
Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|unknown Walker||p81.htm#i2578||||||||||||||||
Fatherunknown Walker
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Taylor Vitti's ancestors
Gerald Walker's ancestors
Brendan Williams' Ancestors
     Eward Walker's parents. Common theories of Edward's parentage have been disproved; unfortunately, at the moment, there are no good leads either to his parents or to any siblings. DNA evidence does give some intriguing hints but does not, as yet, provide any answers.

Almost nothing is known of Edward's early life; his only statement in his pension was that he was born in 1756 somewhere in North Carolina; he did not even indicate where in North Carolina he was born. A number of people seem to assume that he was born in Duplin County, where he lived during the Revolution, but as he was 21 years old at the time, he easily could have moved, perhaps several times, before ending up in Duplin County.

The year he gave is consistent with what limited other information is available, such as the broad parameters of the 1830 Census and his stated age in both his own and Andrew McClary's pension; statements for both pensions were made on the same day. No other evidence confirms his birth in North Carolina, however; all but one of his children are believed to have died before the 1880 Census, the first Census to ask about where parents were born. The one daughter still living, Margaret (Walker) Sulfridge, was living on Lone Mountain, and the enumerator wrote "Tennessee" for the birth places of both of her parents; in fact, that particular enumerator does not seem to have actually asked the question as far too many people in his district are listed with Tennessee.

Deed searches in Duplin County have, as yet, turned up nothing to indicate that Edward owned land there or was included in the distribution of someone else's estate. Several surrounding counties have not been searched in detail and may yield clues.
DNA Research

DNA testing cannot reveal names; instead, it can determine people who share a common ancestor on a direct male line sometime within the past 600 or so years, roughly to around the time that surnames became common in England. It cannot name the ancestor, though, and can only provide some statistical probabilities about how long ago that common ancestor lived.

The hope of anyone getting a test is that his DNA will match a known family line which is documented to an earlier time than his own. For instance, if Edward's DNA matched a line documented to a man born in 1700, we still could not be sure that the man was Edward's ancestor, but we would know that he was related in some fashion and would have a new avenue to search.

Such an early match has not yet turned up on Edward's line, although DNA does suggest close connections to other lines, particularly Samuel Walker of the Edgefield District of South Carolina (link at left), but none of the matched family lines have been traced back to a point where any known ancestor could have been Edward's ancestor, too.

The tested descendants of Edward all fall into what the Walker Surname DNA Project calls group 10. Statistical probabilities hold that every member of group 10 shares a common direct male ancestor, although we do not know which ancestor all of the members share. Three of the test kits (Murray Walker's, 29940, Scott Barton Walker's, 50830, and mine, which is kit 32719) are from proven descendants of Edward B., with my descent being through his son Edward Jr. and the other two kits through his son Samuel.

The markers that are tested can change over the generations, and there is variation among the three kits from this family. The documentation proving all three as descendants is quite strong, however. Because of the variations, we must also consider what the "archetype" values are; in other words, if Edward B. himself could have been tested, what would his exact values be?

The three tests provide enough evidence to make a good guess, although more tests, especially of descendants of other sons of Edward, would be helpful. Some of the markers tested are known to change rapidly, and much of the variation is within those fast-changing markers.

In all cases where marker values for all three of Edward's descendants are available, when one varies, the other two not only match each other but match the other members of group 10. On the markers where only two sets of results are available, one of the two kits matches the rest of group 10 whenever values vary.

In short, Edward's archetype probably consists of the first 37 values shown for test kits 725, 9112, and 73976. So Edward's archetype is an exact match for Samuel Walker of Edgefield as well as Richard Walker of South Carolina, and, given the timeframe and the statistics, he was probably closely related to them, perhaps even a brother or first cousin although DNA cannot tell us for sure.
How DNA Has Helped

Even though DNA has not provided solid leads as to Edward's parents, testing to date has proven quite helpful. Emerging research seems to indicate that kits 9112 and 38212 are probably from descendants of his long-lost son William. Documentary proof has still not been achieved, but circumstantial evidence is growing that connects them to this family.

And even without the clues about William, DNA testing has been extremely helpful in another way – eliminating other families as being completely unrelated. For instance, although documentary evidence had already proven that John Walker of Hawkins County was not Edward's father, only DNA evidence could prove that he and Edward were not related in any fashion.

People not in group 10 are not related to this Walker branch through a direct male line, biologically at least, but some care must be taken in interpreting results. The ancestries provided on the Web site for test participants are submitted by the participants themselves and may not always be correct. In cases where only one descendant of a particular person has been tested, a match cannot be considered conclusive. In other cases, such as John Walker of Hawkins County, enough descendants have been tested to draw a firm conclusion.2 Edward B. Walker said he was born in 1756 in North Carolina; that statement, in his pension application, is the only direct evidence known of his birth. Unfortunately, he did not give an exact date or name the county where he was born, although other evidence suggests that he may have been born sometime after March in that year. His parents are unknown, and the search continues.

At the time that Edward was born, North Carolina was still a colony of Great Britain, and King George II was on the throne. The Carolinas has been established as a royal colony 86 years before Edward's birth, and the two states were formally divided in 1712. At first, North Carolina was settled mostly by religious dissenters and the poor of Virginia; in fact, North Carolina's early citizens were often called "the quintessence of Virginia's discontent." Those early residents were often squatters who established small farms. Unlike its Southern neighbors, North Carolina was not dominated by aristocrats and plantations, and the citizen's sense of rugged individualism made the colony one of the most democratic of the original British colonies alongside Rhode Island.

Over time, and starting before Edward's birth, other groups flooded into North Carolina, including the Scotch-Irish, a group to which many believe Edward's family may have belonged. The Scotch-Irish were not actually Irish at all but were Scot Lowlanders, Presbyterians who, years before, had been forced into northern Ireland. Because of tensions with the Irish Catholics and oppressive economic conditions imposed by the British government, tens of thousands left Ireland and came to the American colonies in the early 1700s.

At present, nothing is known as to when Edward's family came to North Carolina or from where; they may have been there decades before his birth or perhaps only months. And until specific ancestors can be proven to connect overseas, the origin of this branch of the family cannot be known. DNA evidence does suggest, however, some possibility that the family may have been English in origin, not Scotch-Irish.

The first 21 years of Edward's life are a blank to researchers; except for the fact that he was probably educated as a child since he could read and write, nothing at all is known – not where he lived or who he might have known. Although he was born in North Carolina and was in North Carolina when serving in the Revolution, at present, we cannot even know whether his family was in the state the entire time.

Jane Horn's origins are even more obscure. She was born about 1772, and her father's name was Frederick. There is no evidence to show where she might have been born. There are a handful of mentions of her father presumably in some early records, and she might have been born in southwest Virginia, although that location is nothing better than wild speculation at the moment.
The American Revolution

The first known facts about Edward's life as an adult begin shortly after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain and King George III on July 4, 1776. The following spring, Edward was living in Duplin County, North Carolina, when he was drafted to serve his first term of service in the Revolution.

The details of Edward's service are a little confusing. Huge numbers of North Carolina records of the period were destroyed in the 1800s, so piecing together the complete story is difficult to impossible. According to Edward's pension, he first served in the spring of 1777 under a Captain Nathan Hill in a regiment commanded by a Colonel John Ashure. Both are probably mispellings, and little is known of this company. Edward's pension was approved, so whatever method the government had to confirm his service, the government apparently did confirm it, but no record of that confirmation is included with the pension.

One other known pension, that of a man named Thomas Bullard (S.6770) talks of serving in Duplin County under a Captain Nathan Hall, who at that time, probably 1781, was attached to Colonel James Kenan. He also speaks of serving under a captain Hardy Holmes from Duplin County under a Colonel Ashton, presumably Phillip Ashton, in 1778 a few months after one of Edward's tours of duty. "Ashure" could have meant Ashton, or, additionally, may have been John Ashe, Jr., who had actually risen to General by then.

Connecting what is known, Nathan Hall probably stood on the steps of the courthouse in Duplin County and draft the already-existing local militia into service. The company marched to Wilmington, North Carolina, where his unit joined other forces under General Griffith Rutherford. They served at Wilmington and nearby Brunswick to prevent a British landing there; ships were offshore much of the time.

No general engagement occurred, although Edward spoke of several skirmishes with exchanges of gunfire. The militia in situations like this did face peril, but, being short-timers, they often performed manual labor to allow the more regular troops to rest, such as building earthworks and moving equipment. They sometimes got smaller rations than the regular troops as well, although Edward, in his pension, mentions of none of these things.

After three months, Edward was discharged, and he returned home to Duplin County. In each of the next two springs, in 1778 and 1779, Edward was again drafted under the same captain and went to Wilmington and Brunswick.

Some time after those terms, he stated that he was drafted to serve under a Captain Harrison or Harris in the regiment of Colonel Hogan, probably a reference to Colonel James Hogan. Instead of going to Wilmington, he was stationed in Halifax, North Carolina, on the Roanoke River, again for about three months.

Not all of those who lived in the colonies supported independence, and some, though definitely a minority, openly opposed it. Probably about a third were loyal to the British government during the war and were known as "Loyalists" or often derisively as "Tories" after the party then in power in Great Britain. The rebels who fought for independence were known often as "Patriots" or sometimes "Whigs" after the largest minority party in Great Britain.

All told, some 50,000 Americans fought for the British, and these forces had a significant influence in many places, including much of North Carolina. Loyalists generated significant terror among the population, and many revolutionaries stayed close to home in order to protect their families and property. On the other hand, many who supported the King, even those who did not fight, sometimes found their land and other property taken by a suspicious population.

Tories sometimes controlled parts of North Carolina and were sporadically active for some time. The British finally captured Charleston in 1780, and a large army under Lord Cornwallis invaded North Carolina. On 7 October 1780, Americans at Kings Mountain decisively defeated the British, and Cornwallis retreated to the vicinity of Wilmington. Though the timing is unknown, Edward volunteered several times to go on scouting parties against the Tories. In one engagement, Edward was wounded twice in the head with a sword, and he carried those scars for the rest of his life. He was also captured when he was wounded, but he soon escaped.

James More, a friend of Edward's who served with Edward at times during the war, said years later that he "…Remembers well to have heard it spoken of in the army that the said Edward Walker was a verry valliant soldier and a true whig [patriot] and more particularly when the army was stationed at Wilmington North Carolina when the present applicant [Edward] was verry highly spoken of as a soldier…"
Moving To Sullivan County, Tennessee

Some time after the war, probably in the late 1780s, Edward moved to Tennessee; whether he lived anywhere else in the interim is unknown, nor is it known who moved with him. There is no evidence that he married before his one known marriage, to Jane Horn, but given his experiences and their ages at their marriage, certainly the possibility for an earlier marriage arises.

Why did he move, and why did he pick Sullivan County? Until more is known of this period in his life, speculation is the only avenue available. the government had banned settlement west of the Alleghenies, but the ban was often ignored; after the war especially, people flooded west into Tennessee, Kentucky, and other such places. A substantial portion of Duplin County's population seems to have left in the decade after the war.

Edward himself seems to have decided to stay where the Wilderness Road to Kentucky met the Great Wagon Road from the north. It was there in Sullivan County where he presumably met and soon married Jane Horn. They were married about the first of May in 1790 at a church on Horse Creek by a Baptist minister named Richard Murrell.

Murrell was a frontier preacher of some note. Jane was quite clear that the couple was married in a church, with the banns of marriage being posted for three consecutive Sundays before the marriage. She was less clear about the exact date, always saying "about the first", not "on the first". She also indicated that the church had "gone to destruction". The actual church may have been long forgotten, but may have been the Double Springs Baptist Church, one of several where Murrell preached for over 30 years. While Double Springs is still an active church, church history suggests that it may have burned about 1809.

For a while, the family seems to have lived around the area of Horse Creek/Jared's Branch/Falling Water, with Jane stating that, at one point, they also lived on Reedy Creek across from Long Island in Kingsport. Edward also mentioned living in Russell County, Virginia, for some period of time; his name does appear on tax rolls there from 1800 to 1802, but whether the person named was him or not is unknown. There have been no land records found for this period in his life.

Sometime before 1813, Edward moved to Bays Mountain to a location described as being on the road from Jonesborough to Armstrong's Ford on the middle ridge of the mountain. The exact location is unknown but is thought to have been on or near Blair's Gap Road just over the Sullivan/Hawkins County border near the old Dunkard Church.
A Religious Conversion?

An apparent religious conversion is documented in a separate article.
Early Married Life

Living near the intersection of major migration routes, they had contact with people from all over, and while there were still some trouble with Native Americans at times, most of the trouble subsided quickly, although a granddaughter claimed that Edward moved to Bays Mountain specifically to "see Indians coming from all sides"

About their daily lives, little is known. What is known of the people in this part of Tennessee in general at this time is that their existence was dedicated to survival. Those living on the frontier had no time to be idle and no access to luxuries though the standard of living quickly improved after the turn of the century.

The authors of Tennessee: A Short History [Stanley J. Folmsbee, Robert E. Corlew, Enoch L. Mitchell, 1969, pp. 115-116] give a good description of the living conditions of a typical family at that time in East Tennessee. A family would live in a one-room log cabin with a loft where the boys would sleep. The cabin would have a large fireplace needed both for heat and for cooking.

The floor usually consisted of either dirt or of logs split in two with the flat side up; later, planks were used. Since nails were not readily available, the roof was usually made with long, white oak clapboards held in place by ridgepoles and by wooden pegs. Doors and windows were sawed out of the walls, and the windows were covered by glazed paper and wooden shutters.

Early settlers typically had very little furniture, none of it fancy. Early beds were simply pieces of wood attached to the wall with wooden pegs; mattresses consisted of bed ticks filled with straw or pine needles covered with animal skins. A large clapboard on wooden legs served as a table, and chairs were short sections of tree trunks. Spoons were whittled from animal horns or from wood. Gourds were often used for many purposes, and clothing hung from antlers or from pegs on the wall.

Food was surprisingly varied at the time. Though corn was almost always served in one form or another, vegetables, fruits, nuts, maple sugar, and honey were often available. At first, pioneers ate wild animals for the most part, but, as herds increased, domestic animals were eaten. Meat was preserved by salting or by stringing it over a slow fire to dry.

Early pioneers usually dressed much like the Indians of the area. Hunting shirts made of dressed deerskin reached halfway down the thighs, fitting loosely and fringed at the bottom. Pants were made of similar material, and moccasins were made from either dressed buckskin or buffalo hide. Leggings, which protected against briars and snakes, were wide strips of deerskin wrapped around the ankles. Women wore dresses of linsey, which was a coarse cloth made from linen and wool or cotton and wool, or osnaburg, a coarse, heavy cloth originally made from linen and also used for making sacks; dresses were usually dyed in various colors. Jewelry was practically unknown.

Farming implements were rudimentary at best, and settlers made their own implements and other supplies, including soap and candles. Plows were usually made of wood at first, except for an iron point bolted on known as a "bull tongue;" iron plowshares came soon afterward. Hoes and harrows were also used. Grain was cut with a reap hook or cradle and was separated from the straw with a flail or by the hooves of horses.

The people of the frontier were isolated from the rest of the country to a great degree; in fact, that isolation did not begin to end until the coming of the railroads mostly after the Civil War. While newspapers were started in some areas such as Rogersville and Knoxville over time, news traveled slowly, especially international news. In upper East Tennessee, mountains and untamed rivers hindered communication and trade for decades.

This Spartan existence is probably very much like the experience of Edward and Jane, their family, and most of the early settlers in the area. Education, in particular, was a problem. Although at least one of the younger children, Jonathan, was able to read and write, most were not. At the time that the Walkers settled in what would become Tennessee, there simply were no schools and few if any tutors available.
Settling on Mulberry Creek

As usual with this family, land records are sparse, and not enough exist to determine exactly when the family began its move to Mulberry Creek in what was then Claiborne County and whether they all moved at once. Apparently around 1816 or 1817, the couple, with some if not most of their children, moved to the area of Mulberry Creek and Little Sycamore Valley; exactly where Jane and Edward themselves lived is unknown, although they have have lived in the still-existing home of Edward Jr. for a while, and they seem to have lived with son Jonathan who was probably a short distance away at the intersection with Rebel Hollow Road.

People who visit the area today are struck by its beauty but also its extreme isolation. Modern travelers would tend to believe that the Walkers sought that isolation in moving from the growing community near Kingsport. In fact, at the time they moved to Claiborne County, the area was not isolated at all.

A thriving community had formed at Mulberry Gap at least by 1803, and people that the Walkers must have known settled the area no later than 1802. John Jones, a Revolutionary War veteran, had moved from the Jared's Branch area in Sullivan County to Hoop Creek in Claiborne County by then, and his wife was Mary Fitzpatrick, sister to James Fitzpatrick who married a Tussey sister as did two of Edward Walker's sons; in fact, one of this couple's sons, Thomas Fitzspatrick Jones, married one of Edward's daughters after the Walkers had moved to Claiborne County. And there were others in the area.

So the Walkers did not move to a place where they knew no one, nor was the area as isolated as it now seems. The Mulberry Gap Road, which once encompassed also what is now called Little Sycamore Road, was a heavily-traveled path to Kentucky and Virginia, with easy road and river access to major markets in the region. Over time, the importance of Cumberland Gap diminished, and new roads and different settlement patterns caused the Mulberry area to be bypassed.
Later Life

Son Jonathan wrote in the pension application that he had lived with his parents all but two years of his life but gave no details of the two years. Edward was probably ill for several of his later years; when he gave his pension deposition in 1832, he said he was "so old and infirm that he cannot attend court with out greatly injurying of his health and [he stated] that he is afflicted with a disease he is advised by his Doctor caled the dropsy which has so completely unmanned him that he has scarcely any use of himself."

The term "dropsy" dates to an era where symptoms themselves were called the disease without an understanding of the underlying cause. Dropsy, for instance, was used to refer to most any sort of fluid buildup in the body; however, it most often referred to what is now known as congestive heart failure. The disease was somewhat treatable even at that time with a drug still used sometimes today, digitalis; Edward's treatment from his doctor is unknown. This 1832 statement tends to indicate that Edward was ill for the last years of his life, but exceptions about courthouse attendance were often made for older citizens, so the amount of his impairment cannot be judged. He lived for six more years after this statement.

Edward died on Sunday, 26 August 1838. His place of burial is unknown; a large number of graves from that era in that area were never marked. The likelihood of identifying his grave today is quite slim, although with the discovery of Edward Jr.'s grave in 2005, the possibility does still exist.

After Edward's death, Jane did receive his final pension payment and applied for a widow's pension, which was never granted. That long story can be found with the pension documents.

Jane continued to live in the area, although with whom is unknown, until at least early 1845 and perhaps as late as about 1850. As with Edward, her place of burial is unknown, although Tim Walker has identified a good possibility in the cemetery across the street from Edward Jr.'s house.3 Edward B. Walker Sr. was born in 1756 at North Carolina, United States; Edward B. Walker said he was born in 1756 in North Carolina; that statement, in his pension application, is the only direct evidence known of his birth. Unfortunately, he did not give an exact date or name the county where he was born, although other evidence suggests that he may have been born sometime after March in that year. His parents are unknown, and the search continues.

At the time that Edward was born, North Carolina was still a colony of Great Britain, and King George II was on the throne. The Carolinas has been established as a royal colony 86 years before Edward's birth, and the two states were formally divided in 1712. At first, North Carolina was settled mostly by religious dissenters and the poor of Virginia; in fact, North Carolina's early citizens were often called "the quintessence of Virginia's discontent." Those early residents were often squatters who established small farms. Unlike its Southern neighbors, North Carolina was not dominated by aristocrats and plantations, and the citizen's sense of rugged individualism made the colony one of the most democratic of the original British colonies alongside Rhode Island.

Over time, and starting before Edward's birth, other groups flooded into North Carolina, including the Scotch-Irish, a group to which many believe Edward's family may have belonged. The Scotch-Irish were not actually Irish at all but were Scot Lowlanders, Presbyterians who, years before, had been forced into northern Ireland. Because of tensions with the Irish Catholics and oppressive economic conditions imposed by the British government, tens of thousands left Ireland and came to the American colonies in the early 1700s.

At present, nothing is known as to when Edward's family came to North Carolina or from where; they may have been there decades before his birth or perhaps only months. And until specific ancestors can be proven to connect overseas, the origin of this branch of the family cannot be known. DNA evidence does suggest, however, some possibility that the family may have been English in origin, not Scotch-Irish.

The first 21 years of Edward's life are a blank to researchers; except for the fact that he was probably educated as a child since he could read and write, nothing at all is known – not where he lived or who he might have known. Although he was born in North Carolina and was in North Carolina when serving in the Revolution, at present, we cannot even know whether his family was in the state the entire time.
Bill Longmire reports that there is an extant record of the sale of
property on Rockfish Creek in Duplin Co. in 1779. This could have been
his birthplace.1,3 Drafted into the Revolutionary War service. He was wounded, and taken as
a POW, He was awarded a pension for his service.

We have the compilation of Annie Walker Burns, geneaologist and cousin
of Leroy H Walker, that shows Edward Sr. fought in the American
Revolution, having been drafted.

We have copies of his application for a Revolutionary War pension,
authorized by Congress in 1836. He received $40 per annum.

We also have testimony to his service in the War, in one skirmish (for
which he volunteered to be in the patrol), He was wounded twice in the
head by a sword, taken captive by the redcoats, but soon escaped.

At the time of his application for the pension, he spoke of the
dibilitating health dropsy, whch probably was actually congestive heart
failure.

In an email of 5/4/97, Wm B Longmire (whose ggGrandmother was Malissa
Walker Atkins, daughter of Henry J and Lucinda Walker) says the birth
took place in NC, but maybe not in Duplin Co.

The first known facts about Edward's life as an adult begin shortly after the United States declared its independence from Great Britain and King George III on July 4, 1776. The following spring, Edward was living in Duplin County, North Carolina, when he was drafted to serve his first term of service in the Revolution.

The details of Edward's service are a little confusing. Huge numbers of North Carolina records of the period were destroyed in the 1800s, so piecing together the complete story is difficult to impossible. According to Edward's pension, he first served in the spring of 1777 under a Captain Nathan Hill in a regiment commanded by a Colonel John Ashure. Both are probably mispellings, and little is known of this company. Edward's pension was approved, so whatever method the government had to confirm his service, the government apparently did confirm it, but no record of that confirmation is included with the pension.

One other known pension, that of a man named Thomas Bullard (S.6770) talks of serving in Duplin County under a Captain Nathan Hall, who at that time, probably 1781, was attached to Colonel James Kenan. He also speaks of serving under a captain Hardy Holmes from Duplin County under a Colonel Ashton, presumably Phillip Ashton, in 1778 a few months after one of Edward's tours of duty. "Ashure" could have meant Ashton, or, additionally, may have been John Ashe, Jr., who had actually risen to General by then.

Connecting what is known, Nathan Hall probably stood on the steps of the courthouse in Duplin County and draft the already-existing local militia into service. The company marched to Wilmington, North Carolina, where his unit joined other forces under General Griffith Rutherford. They served at Wilmington and nearby Brunswick to prevent a British landing there; ships were offshore much of the time.

No general engagement occurred, although Edward spoke of several skirmishes with exchanges of gunfire. The militia in situations like this did face peril, but, being short-timers, they often performed manual labor to allow the more regular troops to rest, such as building earthworks and moving equipment. They sometimes got smaller rations than the regular troops as well, although Edward, in his pension, mentions of none of these things.

After three months, Edward was discharged, and he returned home to Duplin County. In each of the next two springs, in 1778 and 1779, Edward was again drafted under the same captain and went to Wilmington and Brunswick.

Some time after those terms, he stated that he was drafted to serve under a Captain Harrison or Harris in the regiment of Colonel Hogan, probably a reference to Colonel James Hogan. Instead of going to Wilmington, he was stationed in Halifax, North Carolina, on the Roanoke River, again for about three months.

Not all of those who lived in the colonies supported independence, and some, though definitely a minority, openly opposed it. Probably about a third were loyal to the British government during the war and were known as "Loyalists" or often derisively as "Tories" after the party then in power in Great Britain. The rebels who fought for independence were known often as "Patriots" or sometimes "Whigs" after the largest minority party in Great Britain.

All told, some 50,000 Americans fought for the British, and these forces had a significant influence in many places, including much of North Carolina. Loyalists generated significant terror among the population, and many revolutionaries stayed close to home in order to protect their families and property. On the other hand, many who supported the King, even those who did not fight, sometimes found their land and other property taken by a suspicious population.

Tories sometimes controlled parts of North Carolina and were sporadically active for some time. The British finally captured Charleston in 1780, and a large army under Lord Cornwallis invaded North Carolina. On 7 October 1780, Americans at Kings Mountain decisively defeated the British, and Cornwallis retreated to the vicinity of Wilmington. Though the timing is unknown, Edward volunteered several times to go on scouting parties against the Tories. In one engagement, Edward was wounded twice in the head with a sword, and he carried those scars for the rest of his life. He was also captured when he was wounded, but he soon escaped.

James More, a friend of Edward's who served with Edward at times during the war, said years later that he "…Remembers well to have heard it spoken of in the army that the said Edward Walker was a verry valliant soldier and a true whig [patriot] and more particularly when the army was stationed at Wilmington North Carolina when the present applicant [Edward] was verry highly spoken of as a soldier…"

circa 1776.1,3 He lived circa 1780 in at Sullivan, Tennessee, United States; Some time after the war, probably in the late 1780s, Edward moved to Tennessee; whether he lived anywhere else in the interim is unknown, nor is it known who moved with him. There is no evidence that he married before his one known marriage, to Jane Horn, but given his experiences and their ages at their marriage, certainly the possibility for an earlier marriage arises.

Why did he move, and why did he pick Sullivan County? Until more is known of this period in his life, speculation is the only avenue available. the government had banned settlement west of the Alleghenies, but the ban was often ignored; after the war especially, people flooded west into Tennessee, Kentucky, and other such places. A substantial portion of Duplin County's population seems to have left in the decade after the war.3 He married Jane Horn, daughter of Frederick Horn and Jane Horn (married name), circa 1 May 1790 at Horse Creek, Sullivan, Tennessee, United States; Edward himself seems to have decided to stay where the Wilderness Road to Kentucky met the Great Wagon Road from the north. It was there in Sullivan County where he presumably met and soon married Jane Horn. They were married about the first of May in 1790 at a church on Horse Creek by a Baptist minister named Richard Murrell.4,3 Edward B. Walker Sr. was Methodist

Full church records citing the memberships of each of our early Walkers have not been found, but enough is known to make some assumptions about our ancestors and an apparent conversion.

Prior to the American Revolution, there were several established churches and official religions in some colonies. Since so little is known about our Walker ancestors during that period, we have no idea what religion even Edward B. Walker followed from birth, much less his parents.

However, following the war, sentiment turned against the establishment of religion, and the mainline denominations especially suffered. Many people turned to the newer denominations, particularly Baptist and Methodist, some of which seemed more democratic.

Especially on the frontier in places like Tennessee, the older denominations failed to take hold. Among other reasons, the older denominations insisted on well-educated pastors and all the accouterments to which they were accustomed. The living conditions and spread-out nature of the people on the frontier meant that the older denominations were not able to serve the growing populations. The Methodists in particular, with their circuit-riding ministers, were well-suited to serving the needs of far-flung congregations.

At the time that Edward B. Walker and Jane Horn married in 1790, one or both were probably Baptist. After all, they were married in a Baptist church by a Baptist minister named Richard Murrell. At the time, civil ceremonies and even common-law marriages were perfectly acceptable and quite common, so marriage in a church typically meant that at least one if not both parties were members of that church.

In the late 1790s and early 1800s, Methodists, most prominently Bishop Francis Asbury, came to Sullivan County frequently and won many converts. Again, evidence is only indirect, but when religious affiliations can be proven, the Walkers, Tusseys, and other neighbors of the Walkers all appear to have become Methodists in that early period in Sullivan County.

Once they moved to Claiborne County, they may have associated with the Methodist Church in Tazewell, at least at one point. When Jane was applying for a pension, Charles McAnnally, a minister there, and Benjamin Sewell, an elder, both testified on her behalf. About the same time, though, son Joseph gave land for a Methodist church where his brother, Jonathan, would preach. Whether that church was actually built is unclear; Joseph's daughter Anna and her husband would later give land to build the New Salem Baptist Church, which still exists.

So at least one of the sons of Edward B. Walker was a Methodist minister, and another, John W., may have been but was not necessarily named for John Wesley. One of their grandsons, Henry (son of Edward Jr.) was a Methodist circuit rider, and at least two granddaughters married Methodist ministers: Edward Jr.'s daughter Jane married Shadrach Ball, and Samuel Walker's daughter Malinda married Alvis Brogan, who was either a minister or at least helped to start a Methodist church.
Remains of Thomas Chapel Methodist Church near Mulberry Gap; photo taken 9/2/2005 by Phillip A. Walker.

At least some of the Walkers, including Edward Walker, Jr.'s widow Sarah (Crumley) Walker and his sons Jacob, William, James, and Green, attended the Thomas Chapel Methodist Church on the Mulberry road a few miles from their house, and Jim and Green were active in the Methodist church in Newport and in later communities where they lived.

Thomas Chapel Methodist Church met in homes for decades, and church records are fragmentary at best. It is no longer a functional church, and, in fact, its last church building is now being used as a barn. Although pictured here, the last building was erected about 1900 and would not have been the building that the Walkers attended.

Even as early as Edward B. Walker's grandchildren, conversions began again, with several becoming Baptist and others joining the Christian Church in Kansas or other denominations. Whether the war and pressure over slavery drove some conversions or simple convenience is unknown. Jacob Shuff Walker, for instance, married into a family descended from a prominent Baptist minister, Rev. Andrew Baker, and while he appears to have remained Methodist for the first decade of his marriage, he eventually joined the Baptist church at Mulberry Gap and later gave land to build another one on Straight Creek, both of which are still in use today.

Religion is certainly a facet of the wider family story, but the exact roll that it played in most of individual lives of the Walkers may never be known. Protestant churches in particular kept few records in the first place, and many that were kept do not survive.3 He lived before 1813 in at Bays Mountain, Sullivan, Tennessee, United States; For a while, the family seems to have lived around the area of Horse Creek/Jared's Branch/Falling Water, with Jane stating that, at one point, they also lived on Reedy Creek across from Long Island in Kingsport. Edward also mentioned living in Russell County, Virginia, for some period of time; his name does appear on tax rolls there from 1800 to 1802, but whether the person named was him or not is unknown. There have been no land records found for this period in his life.

Sometime before 1813, Edward moved to Bays Mountain to a location described as being on the road from Jonesborough to Armstrong's Ford on the middle ridge of the mountain. The exact location is unknown but is thought to have been on or near Blair's Gap Road just over the Sullivan/Hawkins County border near the old Dunkard Church.3 He and Jane Horn lived circa 1816 in at Mulberry Creek, Claiborne, Tennessee, United States; As usual with this family, land records are sparse, and not enough exist to determine exactly when the family began its move to Mulberry Creek in what was then Claiborne County and whether they all moved at once. Apparently around 1816 or 1817, the couple, with some if not most of their children, moved to the area of Mulberry Creek and Little Sycamore Valley; exactly where Jane and Edward themselves lived is unknown, although they have have lived in the still-existing home of Edward Jr. for a while, and they seem to have lived with son Jonathan who was probably a short distance away at the intersection with Rebel Hollow Road.

People who visit the area today are struck by its beauty but also its extreme isolation. Modern travelers would tend to believe that the Walkers sought that isolation in moving from the growing community near Kingsport. In fact, at the time they moved to Claiborne County, the area was not isolated at all.

A thriving community had formed at Mulberry Gap at least by 1803, and people that the Walkers must have known settled the area no later than 1802. John Jones, a Revolutionary War veteran, had moved from the Jared's Branch area in Sullivan County to Hoop Creek in Claiborne County by then, and his wife was Mary Fitzpatrick, sister to James Fitzpatrick who married a Tussey sister as did two of Edward Walker's sons; in fact, one of this couple's sons, Thomas Fitzspatrick Jones, married one of Edward's daughters after the Walkers had moved to Claiborne County. And there were others in the area.

So the Walkers did not move to a place where they knew no one, nor was the area as isolated as it now seems. The Mulberry Gap Road, which once encompassed also what is now called Little Sycamore Road, was a heavily-traveled path to Kentucky and Virginia, with easy road and river access to major markets in the region. Over time, the importance of Cumberland Gap diminished, and new roads and different settlement patterns caused the Mulberry area to be bypassed.3 Edward B. Walker Sr. died on 26 August 1838 at Near, Mulberry Gap, Tennessee, United States.1

Family

Jane Horn b. 1771, d. bt 1849 - 1851
Marriage*He married Jane Horn, daughter of Frederick Horn and Jane Horn (married name), circa 1 May 1790 at Horse Creek, Sullivan, Tennessee, United States; Edward himself seems to have decided to stay where the Wilderness Road to Kentucky met the Great Wagon Road from the north. It was there in Sullivan County where he presumably met and soon married Jane Horn. They were married about the first of May in 1790 at a church on Horse Creek by a Baptist minister named Richard Murrell.4,3 
Children
Last Edited11 Mar 2011
Reference1980

Citations

  1. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.
  2. [S377] Genealogy of Edward B. Walker, online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/…, Finding Edward's Parents and DNA Testing.
  3. [S377] Genealogy of Edward B. Walker, online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/…
  4. [S62] Rev. Robert Walker, "Bob Walker research."
  5. [S95] Vernon K. Pogue Jr, et al Jim & Angela McArthur.
  6. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."

Elbert Alexander Walker1

M, b. 1854
Elbert Alexander Walker|b. 1854|p79.htm#i285|Rev Henry J. Walker|b. 21 Apr 1818\nd. 11 Oct 1871|p79.htm#i987|Lucinda Daugherty|b. c 1823\nd. a 12 Feb 1866|p17.htm#i181|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|William Daugherty||p17.htm#i1372|Jane Overton||p58.htm#i1373|
FatherRev Henry J. Walker b. 21 Apr 1818, d. 11 Oct 1871
MotherLucinda Daugherty b. c 1823, d. a 12 Feb 1866
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Elbert Alexander Walker was born in 1854.
Last Edited26 Aug 2005

Citations

  1. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."

Elizabeth Walker

F, b. 30 May 1815
Elizabeth Walker|b. 30 May 1815|p79.htm#i1583|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|unknown Walker||p81.htm#i2578||||Frederick Horn||p42.htm#i192|Jane Horn (married name)||p42.htm#i193|
FatherEdward B. Walker Sr. b. 1756, d. 26 Aug 1838
MotherJane Horn b. 1771, d. bt 1849 - 1851
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Elizabeth Walker was born on 30 May 1815.
Last Edited28 Oct 2004

Ernie Clyde Walker1

M, b. 3 August 1898, d. 18 July 1991
Ernie Clyde Walker|b. 3 Aug 1898\nd. 18 Jul 1991|p79.htm#i2413|Reverend Daniel Salathial Renfro Walker|b. 9 Nov 1872|p78.htm#i1378|Annie Major Richardson|b. 22 Oct 1870\nd. 1952|p63.htm#i2412|Joseph S. H. Walker|b. 25 Nov 1851\nd. 22 Oct 1918|p80.htm#i965|Sarah M. Bellamy|b. 21 Dec 1851\nd. 8 May 1932|p9.htm#i177|||||||
FatherReverend Daniel Salathial Renfro Walker1 b. 9 Nov 1872
MotherAnnie Major Richardson1 b. 22 Oct 1870, d. 1952
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Ernie Clyde Walker married Augusta Craig.1 Ernie Clyde Walker was born on 3 August 1898 at Tuckerman, Arkansas, United States.1 He married Magenta Bell Parker on 24 June 1925 at Suffolk, Norfolk, Virginia, United States.1 Ernie Clyde Walker died on 18 July 1991 at Bellingham, Washington, United States, at age 92.1

Family 1

Augusta Craig b. 12 Mar 1899, d. 18 Jul 1991
Marriage*He married Augusta Craig.1 

Family 2

Magenta Bell Parker b. 8 Sep 1900, d. 1975
Marriage*Ernie Clyde Walker married Magenta Bell Parker on 24 June 1925 at Suffolk, Norfolk, Virginia, United States.1 
Child
Last Edited2 Dec 2010

Citations

  1. [S363] Phillip Walker, "Daniel Salathiel Renfro Walker."

Ethel Walker

F, b. 7 February 1892, d. 18 October 1966
Ethel Walker|b. 7 Feb 1892\nd. 18 Oct 1966|p79.htm#i1567|Daniel Walker|b. 22 Sep 1853\nd. 7 May 1940|p78.htm#i1561|Nancy Jane Brown|b. 7 Feb 1856\nd. 21 Oct 1920|p11.htm#i1562|Isaac Walker|b. 27 Oct 1822\nd. 22 Jun 1894|p79.htm#i1569|Mary 'Polley' Haynes|b. 10 May 1822\nd. 13 Oct 1899|p41.htm#i1570|Martin Brown||p11.htm#i1563|Sarah (?)||p3.htm#i1564|
FatherDaniel Walker b. 22 Sep 1853, d. 7 May 1940
MotherNancy Jane Brown b. 7 Feb 1856, d. 21 Oct 1920
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Ethel Walker was born on 7 February 1892. She married an unknown person on 1 June 1910. She died on 18 October 1966 at age 74.
Last Edited5 Apr 2004

Gerald J. Walker1

M
Gerald J. Walker||p79.htm#i1034|Reverend Doctor Daniel Downing Walker||p78.htm#i1003|Virginia Lovelady||p50.htm#i1033|James A. Walker|b. 31 Aug 1874\nd. 5 Sep 1932|p79.htm#i175|Lulu B. Downing|b. 15 Dec 1875\nd. 19 Oct 1953|p20.htm#i964|||||||
FatherReverend Doctor Daniel Downing Walker
MotherVirginia Lovelady
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Thomas Downynge Descendants
Gerald Walker's ancestors
     Gerald J. Walker married June Eloyce Fryer on 28 May 1966.1 Gerald J. Walker and June Eloyce Fryer were divorced in April 1988.1 Gerald J. Walker married Yukie Kubo Ueda on 23 December 2005 at Seattle, Washington, United States.1

Family 1

June Eloyce Fryer
Marriage*Gerald J. Walker married June Eloyce Fryer on 28 May 1966.1 
Divorce* Gerald J. Walker and June Eloyce Fryer were divorced in April 1988.1 
Children

Family 2

Yukie Kubo Ueda
Marriage*Gerald J. Walker married Yukie Kubo Ueda on 23 December 2005 at Seattle, Washington, United States.1 
Last Edited2 Apr 2007

Citations

  1. [S170] Interview, Gerald Walker, 5 Jul 2004.

Gladys Enid Walker

F, b. 13 December 1898, d. 7 May 1975
Gladys Enid Walker|b. 13 Dec 1898\nd. 7 May 1975|p79.htm#i1004|James Alvin Walker|b. 31 Aug 1874\nd. 5 Sep 1932|p79.htm#i175|Lulu Bell Downing|b. 15 Dec 1875\nd. 19 Oct 1953|p20.htm#i964|Joseph S. H. Walker|b. 25 Nov 1851\nd. 22 Oct 1918|p80.htm#i965|Sarah M. Bellamy|b. 21 Dec 1851\nd. 8 May 1932|p9.htm#i177|Phillip H. Downing|b. 15 Dec 1851\nd. 29 Sep 1924|p20.htm#i966|Ermina Snook|b. 10 Apr 1854\nd. 7 Jul 1889|p68.htm#i178|
FatherJames Alvin Walker b. 31 Aug 1874, d. 5 Sep 1932
MotherLulu Bell Downing b. 15 Dec 1875, d. 19 Oct 1953
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Thomas Downynge Descendants
     Her married name was Payne. Gladys Enid Walker was born on 13 December 1898 at Benton, Illinois, United States. She married Emerson H. Payne on 16 June 1935. Gladys Enid Walker died on 7 May 1975 at age 76. She was the daughter who helped raise her resultant siblings,marrying fairly late. She and Emerson Payne had no children; but,Emerson, divorced from his first wife, had a son, Charles Payne. By terms of her will, Gladys left (either $50 or $100) to each of her nieces and nephews.1

Family

Emerson H. Payne b. 9 Sep 1898, d. 11 Oct 1967
Marriage*She married Emerson H. Payne on 16 June 1935. 
Last Edited17 Dec 2011

Citations

  1. [S62] Rev. Robert Walker, "Bob Walker research."

Henry Horne Walker1

M, b. 16 August 1807
Henry Horne Walker|b. 16 Aug 1807|p79.htm#i289|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|unknown Walker||p81.htm#i2578||||Frederick Horn||p42.htm#i192|Jane Horn (married name)||p42.htm#i193|
FatherEdward B. Walker Sr.2,1 b. 1756, d. 26 Aug 1838
MotherJane Horn b. 1771, d. bt 1849 - 1851
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Henry Horne Walker was born on 16 August 1807.
Last Edited26 Aug 2005

Citations

  1. [S95] Vernon K. Pogue Jr, et al Jim & Angela McArthur.
  2. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."

Rev Henry J. Walker1,2,3

M, b. 21 April 1818, d. 11 October 1871
Rev Henry J. Walker|b. 21 Apr 1818\nd. 11 Oct 1871|p79.htm#i987|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|Jacob Tussey|b. 1754|p77.htm#i186|Jane Shuff|b. 1772\nd. 1830|p67.htm#i187|
FatherEdward B. Walker Jr. b. 7 Sep 1795, d. 9 Apr 1860
MotherMahala Tussey b. 1802, d. 28 Dec 1842
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Taylor Vitti's ancestors
Gerald Walker's ancestors
Brendan Williams' Ancestors
     Rev Henry J. Walker was born on 21 April 1818 at probably Mulberry Creek, Claiborne, Tennessee, United States; Henry Walker, a son of Edward and Mahala (Tussey) Walker, was born 21 April 1818 probably at his parents' home on Mulberry Creek although possibly on Bays Mountain.4,5 Henry Walker was a Methodist minister, who also owned slaves. He was a circuit rider for the Methodist church.5 He married Lucinda Daugherty, daughter of William Daugherty and Jane Overton, on 21 July 1839 at Mulberry, Claiborne, Tennessee, United States; He first married Lucinda Doherty. Although her tombstone, one shared with Henry, indicates that she was born in 1826, the tombstone apparently was made many years after her death, and she was born about 1823 at the latest and possibly earlier. Evidence of Lucinda's parentage is circumstantial but increasingly strong that she was the daughter of Jane Overton and a much older man, William Doherty, who lived just down the road from the Walkers at the intersection of Little Sycamore and Mulberry Gap Roads. After William Doherty died, Jane Overton married Henry's uncle, Samuel, who would have raised Lucinda.6,4 The family lived in Walkers Ford.

The 1850 Census shows the family lived in Claibome County; the 1860 Census reflects Union County.

Walker's Ford was a thriving community on both banks of the Clinch River, with a ford and ferry crossing apparently from modern Walker's Ford Road in Union County on the west to Bear Creek Road in Claiborne County on the east. Later, perhaps in the very late 1800s but probably the early 1900s, a bridge was built there; Joe Payne has a photo available through the link at right.

The area was inundated when Norris Dam was completed in 1936, and the bridge was torn down. Much of the surrounding land which was not flooded is now owned by TVA, which kept detailed maps of the property owners and cemeteries. Those maps are included at the end of this article.

Walker's Ford was probably named for Rev. Henry Walker, who owned land on both sides. The Walkers began to settle the area in the early 1840s, but at least some gazetteers in the mid-1850s did not include the name; Civil War records do clearly indicate that the name was in use by the war. A letter in AWB1929 attributes the name to his son Daniel Mackmahan Walker, who operated the ferry there for a number of years, but the name was in use when Dan was still too little to have been operating a ferry.

For decades, nearly every family in the area was either related to or at least connected through marriage to the Walkers. The community had its own post office, stores, and a number of homes. It was also a starting point or waystation for farmers taking their goods downriver on flatboats for sale. Knoxville was a closer destination, but, as a major hub for railroads, Chattanooga usually brought better prices. While the trip downstream was by boat, the trip home was usually on foot, although after an especially good sale, a farmer might purchase a horse for the trip.

The exact bounds are unknown and probably changed over time. Today, the name usually refers to the Union County side only, but letters in AWB1929 indicate that people who lived there did at one time refer to both sides by that name.

More often, though, residents referred to the Claiborne County side as Bear Creek or sometimes even Lone Mountain. In my Family Fileoffsite link to WorldConnect, the name "Bear Creek" is typically used on the Claiborne County side for locations that were probably along what is now Bear Creek Road unless contemporary accounts explicitly used a different place name.

Walker's Ford was a major crossing point of the Clinch, although there were fords nearby. Troops, bandits, and everyone else crossed at Walker's Ford during the Civil War, with a skirmish fought there 2 December 1863.

Even before the war, though, many people from the general direction of Knoxville likely crossed at Walker's Ford. Using modern names for streets, travelers often went the eastern route from Bear Creek Road to Lone Mountain Road, following it to Little Sycamore Road and Mulberry Gap Road, reaching the Virginia state line or Mulberry Gap in about 30 miles. Travelers taking the western route could easily reach Tazewell and Cumberland Gap, the latter being about 22 miles away.4,5 Rev Henry J. Walker lived in 1858 in at Bear Creek/Walkers Ford, Claiborne/Union, Tennessee, United States; They moved to the Bear Creek area and what was then the Claiborne County side of Walker's Ford in 1858 and moved to Union County a few years later.4 He married Martha (Marthey) Jane Hatfield, daughter of Adam Yeary Hatfield and Mary Fulkerson Davis, in 1870; Mary's sister Martha had married Henry Walker's brother Jacob. Martha and Henry only had one child before Henry died, and then Martha married William Newton Click and had several more children. Even her second marriage was related in that William was the brother of Andrew J. Click who married the oldest daughter, Elizabeth (Lizzie), of Jacob Shuff and Martha (Davis) Walker.4 Rev Henry J. Walker was buried in 1871 at Gose Cemetery, Bear Creek, Tennessee, United States.4,5 He died on 11 October 1871 at Walkers Ford, Tennessee, United States, at age 53; Source of date of death is Bill Longmire, also a descendant of Henry and Lucinda Walker, in an e-mail letter of 5/21/1997. He says that Claibome County Cemetery Records show this as date of Henry's death,and that he and Lucinda are buried beside one another in Gose Cemetery, in the community of Bear Creek, near former Walker's Ford, TN.5,4

Family 1

Martha (Marthey) Jane Hatfield b. 1 Sep 1840, d. 12 Apr 1918
Marriage*He married Martha (Marthey) Jane Hatfield, daughter of Adam Yeary Hatfield and Mary Fulkerson Davis, in 1870; Mary's sister Martha had married Henry Walker's brother Jacob. Martha and Henry only had one child before Henry died, and then Martha married William Newton Click and had several more children. Even her second marriage was related in that William was the brother of Andrew J. Click who married the oldest daughter, Elizabeth (Lizzie), of Jacob Shuff and Martha (Davis) Walker.4 
Child

Family 2

Lucinda Daugherty b. c 1823, d. a 12 Feb 1866
Marriage*Rev Henry J. Walker married Lucinda Daugherty, daughter of William Daugherty and Jane Overton, on 21 July 1839 at Mulberry, Claiborne, Tennessee, United States; He first married Lucinda Doherty. Although her tombstone, one shared with Henry, indicates that she was born in 1826, the tombstone apparently was made many years after her death, and she was born about 1823 at the latest and possibly earlier. Evidence of Lucinda's parentage is circumstantial but increasingly strong that she was the daughter of Jane Overton and a much older man, William Doherty, who lived just down the road from the Walkers at the intersection of Little Sycamore and Mulberry Gap Roads. After William Doherty died, Jane Overton married Henry's uncle, Samuel, who would have raised Lucinda.6,4 
Children
Last Edited5 Dec 2010

Citations

  1. [S13] Jim & Jane Walker, "Walker: Jim & Jane Walker Research."
  2. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."
  3. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.
  4. [S377] Genealogy of Edward B. Walker, online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/…
  5. [S62] Rev. Robert Walker, "Bob Walker research."
  6. [S66] Bill Longmire, "Walker: Bill Longmire research," e-mail message from Bill Longmire to Rev. Robert Walker.

Iona Walker

F, b. after 11 January 1872
Iona Walker|b. a 11 Jan 1872|p79.htm#i1375|Joseph Selman Hilton Walker|b. 25 Nov 1851\nd. 22 Oct 1918|p80.htm#i965|Sarah Malinda Bellamy|b. 21 Dec 1851\nd. 8 May 1932|p9.htm#i177|Rev Henry J. Walker|b. 21 Apr 1818\nd. 11 Oct 1871|p79.htm#i987|Lucinda Daugherty|b. c 1823\nd. a 12 Feb 1866|p17.htm#i181|John D. Bellamy|b. 20 Sep 1831|p8.htm#i1032|Elizabeth E. Shoemaker|b. c 1830\nd. c 1854|p67.htm#i989|
FatherJoseph Selman Hilton Walker b. 25 Nov 1851, d. 22 Oct 1918
MotherSarah Malinda Bellamy b. 21 Dec 1851, d. 8 May 1932
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Iona Walker was born after 11 January 1872.
Last Edited5 Apr 2004

Isaac Walker

M, b. 27 October 1822, d. 22 June 1894
Isaac Walker|b. 27 Oct 1822\nd. 22 Jun 1894|p79.htm#i1569|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|Jacob Tussey|b. 1754|p77.htm#i186|Jane Shuff|b. 1772\nd. 1830|p67.htm#i187|
FatherEdward B. Walker Jr. b. 7 Sep 1795, d. 9 Apr 1860
MotherMahala Tussey b. 1802, d. 28 Dec 1842
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Isaac Walker was born on 27 October 1822. He married Mary 'Polley' Haynes circa 1839. Isaac Walker died on 22 June 1894 at age 71. He was buried after 22 June 1894 at Straight Creek Cemetery, Sandlick, Tennessee, United States.

Family 1

Children

Family 2

Mary 'Polley' Haynes b. 10 May 1822, d. 13 Oct 1899
Marriage*He married Mary 'Polley' Haynes circa 1839. 
Children
Last Edited21 Apr 2004

Jacob Walker

M, b. after February 1817
Jacob Walker|b. a Feb 1817|p79.htm#i1611|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|Jacob Tussey|b. 1754|p77.htm#i186|Jane Shuff|b. 1772\nd. 1830|p67.htm#i187|
FatherEdward B. Walker Jr. b. 7 Sep 1795, d. 9 Apr 1860
MotherMahala Tussey b. 1802, d. 28 Dec 1842
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Jacob Walker was born after February 1817.
Last Edited20 Dec 2004

Jacob Walker

M, d. 1888
Jacob Walker|d. 1888|p79.htm#i1614|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|Jacob Tussey|b. 1754|p77.htm#i186|Jane Shuff|b. 1772\nd. 1830|p67.htm#i187|
FatherEdward B. Walker Jr. b. 7 Sep 1795, d. 9 Apr 1860
MotherMahala Tussey b. 1802, d. 28 Dec 1842
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Jacob Walker died in 1888.
Last Edited8 Jan 2005

Jacob Walker1

M, b. 27 May 1822
Jacob Walker|b. 27 May 1822|p79.htm#i2071|Joseph Walker|b. 26 Jun 1791\nd. 7 Jan 1851|p80.htm#i280|Mary Tussey||p77.htm#i281|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|||||||
FatherJoseph Walker1 b. 26 Jun 1791, d. 7 Jan 1851
MotherMary Tussey1
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Jacob Walker was born on 27 May 1822 at Claiborne, Tennessee, United States.1
Last Edited26 Aug 2005

Citations

  1. [S271] Kimberly Mcdaniel, 2005.

James Walker

M, b. after 1728
James Walker|b. a 1728|p79.htm#i1044|Robert Walker|b. 1688\nd. 1746|p81.htm#i991|Ann Montgomery|d. 1746|p55.htm#i1031|||||||||||||
FatherRobert Walker b. 1688, d. 1746
MotherAnn Montgomery d. 1746
     James Walker was born after 1728.
Last Edited7 Jul 2004

James Abraham Walker1

M, b. circa 1863
James Abraham Walker|b. c 1863|p79.htm#i286|Rev Henry J. Walker|b. 21 Apr 1818\nd. 11 Oct 1871|p79.htm#i987|Lucinda Daugherty|b. c 1823\nd. a 12 Feb 1866|p17.htm#i181|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|William Daugherty||p17.htm#i1372|Jane Overton||p58.htm#i1373|
FatherRev Henry J. Walker b. 21 Apr 1818, d. 11 Oct 1871
MotherLucinda Daugherty b. c 1823, d. a 12 Feb 1866
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     James Abraham Walker was born circa 1863.
Last Edited20 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."

James Alvin Walker1,2,3,4

M, b. 31 August 1874, d. 5 September 1932
James Alvin Walker|b. 31 Aug 1874\nd. 5 Sep 1932|p79.htm#i175|Joseph Selman Hilton Walker|b. 25 Nov 1851\nd. 22 Oct 1918|p80.htm#i965|Sarah Malinda Bellamy|b. 21 Dec 1851\nd. 8 May 1932|p9.htm#i177|Rev Henry J. Walker|b. 21 Apr 1818\nd. 11 Oct 1871|p79.htm#i987|Lucinda Daugherty|b. c 1823\nd. a 12 Feb 1866|p17.htm#i181|John D. Bellamy|b. 20 Sep 1831|p8.htm#i1032|Elizabeth E. Shoemaker|b. c 1830\nd. c 1854|p67.htm#i989|
FatherJoseph Selman Hilton Walker b. 25 Nov 1851, d. 22 Oct 1918
MotherSarah Malinda Bellamy b. 21 Dec 1851, d. 8 May 1932
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Thomas Downynge Descendants
Taylor Vitti's ancestors
Gerald Walker's ancestors
Brendan Williams' Ancestors
     James Alvin Walker was born on 31 August 1874 at Walkers Ford, Tennessee, United States.1 He married Lulu Bell Downing, daughter of Phillip Henry Downing and Ermina Snook, on 10 March 1897 at Benton, Franklin, Illinois, United States. Abstract of written material by Reverend Robert Walker.

James Alvin Walker moved from Walker's Ford at an early age with his parents and siblings to Benton, IL. He grew up there, and eventually met Lulu Belle Downing; they were married there (license record is available in the Robert Walker files).

Their first child, Gladys, was bom in Benton, IL; soon thereafter,the family moved to Tecumseh County, Oklahoma where they launched a homestead farm (perhaps one of the 'Sooners'). Here, Leroy (my father), Neva, Phillip Raymond and Wilbur Alvin were born.

In Feb., 1910-according to a letter by Neva Walker Church that's in the genealogy work provided by Jane and Jimmy (James Arthur) Walker-the family moved to Roseburg, OR. Here 'PapaP or 'Pop' (as later children called him) essentially abandoned farming, and became a wheeling and dealing real estate agent, with some modest success.

The family moved 14 times in the intervening Oregon and California years (moving to Pomona about 1922). The houses were always discovered in the real estate business, and were rented as being a bit better or larger than the last one.
Neva's letter tells about the several Oregon homes, including the one in which their father built a fine house.

The real estate work continued in Pomona. The Oklahoma property- rented since leaving that state-was mortgaged just prior to or around the time of the 1929 Stock Market Crash, but then lost around 1931or '32 due to inability to meet payments, to provide funds to help bail Philip Raymond out of a business misadventure in which he had engaged.

Official death certificate states that he owned his own real estate business and that at the time of his death the family had lived for nine years in California; that would put the move from Oregon; ca. 1923.

Death certificate states he was born in'Clayboume Co., Penn.' His parents were said to be born in the same place. The county was Claiborne and the state wasTennessee, not Pennsylvania!

It is not clear whether James and Lulu Belle moved their family from Oklahoma to Oregon prior to or after the move of James's parents who had a farm outside of Salem. The 'lore' is that the farm's location is now the locale of Salem's motel strip (and other businesses) close by Interstate Highway 5. The farm was sold, unfortunately, long before such a development took place.

In any case, the family lived in Roseburg and surrounding small towns (and possibly in Salem as well), as James Walker pursued the real estate enterprise, part of which called for living on a place, improving it, and selling it.1 James Alvin Walker was Farmer and subsequently Real Estate Developer between 1900 and 1932.1 He died on 5 September 1932 at Pomona, Los Angeles, California, United States, at age 58.1 Carl Walker remembered that his father was quite depressed that year. Possible causes: loss of the Oklahoma homestead-rental, lack of real estate business, and decreased sense of purpose or means of making money. Carl recalls that he went to his office to sit there relatively unoccupied for severa hours, returned home to his rocker to sit, read the paper and remain there rather uncommunicatively.

Home on Labor Day, at some point in the day James Walker decided to knock down walnuts from a tree on some other piece of property that the family either owned or had rented. I am guessing this was done in hope of acquiring a quantity of nuts that could be shelled and sold. It was there that he had his fatal heart attack.

Carl stated that the church (Pomona Methodist) was packed as almost no other funeral service before had been; church folk and several from the community were present to pay tribute to this man of high faith and great moral integrity.

The Family was extremely poor. Only Gladys and Carl of the children yet at home had paying jobs; they provided funds for food. Carl was given food at liberal discount and on weekends his boss allowed him to take quantities of unsold fresh produce home to the family. Carl's boss generously provided the funds to purchase a grave and pay for funeral costs.

Later, when his wife Lulu died, in order to have the remains of the two be next to one another, his bones (the casket had deteriorated by 1953, when she died) were disinterred (with no guarantee that all of the bones had been found) and reburied next to those of his wife.


We have a moving letter written by a cousin and boyhood friend toLulu Belle (my grandmother), extolling the gentle strength of character he had celebrated in my grandfather. It is a priceless testimony.

Death certificate states day of death was Sept. 5, 1932, and not Sept. 8, as some other information has it; filing date of certificate was 7 Sept. 1932. Cause of death is'Thrombosis of Coronary Artery.' Contributing cause: 'Areteriosclerosis' and 'Hypertension,'

The certificate also states that burial took place on 9/8/1932,and in Pomona Cemetery.1 He was buried on 8 September 1932 at Pomona Cemetery, Pomona, Los Angeles, California, United States.4

Family

Lulu Bell Downing b. 15 Dec 1875, d. 19 Oct 1953
Marriage*He married Lulu Bell Downing, daughter of Phillip Henry Downing and Ermina Snook, on 10 March 1897 at Benton, Franklin, Illinois, United States. 
Children
Last Edited17 Dec 2011

Citations

  1. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.
  2. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."
  3. [S13] Jim & Jane Walker, "Walker: Jim & Jane Walker Research."
  4. [S62] Rev. Robert Walker, "Bob Walker research."

James Arthur Walker1,2

M, b. 26 October 1920, d. 6 July 1996
James Arthur Walker|b. 26 Oct 1920\nd. 6 Jul 1996|p79.htm#i262|James Alvin Walker|b. 31 Aug 1874\nd. 5 Sep 1932|p79.htm#i175|Lulu Bell Downing|b. 15 Dec 1875\nd. 19 Oct 1953|p20.htm#i964|Joseph S. H. Walker|b. 25 Nov 1851\nd. 22 Oct 1918|p80.htm#i965|Sarah M. Bellamy|b. 21 Dec 1851\nd. 8 May 1932|p9.htm#i177|Phillip H. Downing|b. 15 Dec 1851\nd. 29 Sep 1924|p20.htm#i966|Ermina Snook|b. 10 Apr 1854\nd. 7 Jul 1889|p68.htm#i178|
FatherJames Alvin Walker b. 31 Aug 1874, d. 5 Sep 1932
MotherLulu Bell Downing b. 15 Dec 1875, d. 19 Oct 1953
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Thomas Downynge Descendants
     James Arthur Walker was born on 26 October 1920. Heserved in the military after 1941 as Served as a junior officer during the second world war. He married Lucy Jane Collins on 28 December 1941 at California, United States. James Arthur Walker lived after 1945 in at Sacramento, California, United States. He died on 6 July 1996 at Carmichael, California, United States, at age 75. He was buried after 6 July 1996 at Sacramento, California, United States.

Family

Lucy Jane Collins
Marriage*He married Lucy Jane Collins on 28 December 1941 at California, United States. 
Children
Last Edited17 Mar 2012

Citations

  1. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.
  2. [S10] Personal Statement of Ron Williams documented herein.

James Taylor Walker1

M, b. November 1848, d. 13 August 1912
James Taylor Walker|b. Nov 1848\nd. 13 Aug 1912|p79.htm#i284|Rev Henry J. Walker|b. 21 Apr 1818\nd. 11 Oct 1871|p79.htm#i987|Lucinda Daugherty|b. c 1823\nd. a 12 Feb 1866|p17.htm#i181|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|William Daugherty||p17.htm#i1372|Jane Overton||p58.htm#i1373|
FatherRev Henry J. Walker b. 21 Apr 1818, d. 11 Oct 1871
MotherLucinda Daugherty b. c 1823, d. a 12 Feb 1866
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
      James Taylor Walker also went by the name of Taylor. He married Luara Virginia Larmer.2 This child was called 'Taylor.' It is said that he had the land across the river from that of his father, and was the operator of the ford; hence, it is for him that Walker's Ford was named.3

James Taylor Walker was born in November 1848 at Walker's Ford, Tennessee, United States.3,2 He married Martha Riddle circa 1868. 'Walker's Ford' was apparently not so-named until Taylor himself was an adult, operating a ferry service. Claibome Co. is the more accurate birthplace.3 James Taylor Walker died on 13 August 1912 at Harlan, Kentucky, United States, at age 63.2

Family 1

Luara Virginia Larmer d. 3 Jul 1889
Marriage*He married Luara Virginia Larmer.2 

Family 2

Martha Riddle
Marriage*James Taylor Walker married Martha Riddle circa 1868. 
Last Edited4 Dec 2005

Citations

  1. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.
  2. [S304] Ernie Grubb, 18 Aug 2005.
  3. [S62] Rev. Robert Walker, "Bob Walker research."

James Wesley Walker1

M, b. 4 August 1929, d. 25 November 1985
James Wesley Walker|b. 4 Aug 1929\nd. 25 Nov 1985|p79.htm#i386|Reverend Leroy Hilton Walker|b. 28 Dec 1900\nd. 17 Nov 1969|p80.htm#i205|Catherine Alene Ritchie|b. 24 Aug 1905\nd. 2 Apr 1934|p64.htm#i382|James A. Walker|b. 31 Aug 1874\nd. 5 Sep 1932|p79.htm#i175|Lulu B. Downing|b. 15 Dec 1875\nd. 19 Oct 1953|p20.htm#i964|||||||
FatherReverend Leroy Hilton Walker b. 28 Dec 1900, d. 17 Nov 1969
MotherCatherine Alene Ritchie b. 24 Aug 1905, d. 2 Apr 1934
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
Thomas Downynge Descendants
     James Wesley Walker was Pharmacist.2 He was born on 4 August 1929. He died on 25 November 1985 at age 56.
Last Edited21 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S195] Rev. Robert Walker, "Bob Walker: Additional Genealogy Data," e-mail to Ron Williams, 2003/2004.
  2. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.

James William Walker

M, b. 20 April 1894, d. 1 May 1962
James William Walker|b. 20 Apr 1894\nd. 1 May 1962|p79.htm#i1568|Daniel Walker|b. 22 Sep 1853\nd. 7 May 1940|p78.htm#i1561|Nancy Jane Brown|b. 7 Feb 1856\nd. 21 Oct 1920|p11.htm#i1562|Isaac Walker|b. 27 Oct 1822\nd. 22 Jun 1894|p79.htm#i1569|Mary 'Polley' Haynes|b. 10 May 1822\nd. 13 Oct 1899|p41.htm#i1570|Martin Brown||p11.htm#i1563|Sarah (?)||p3.htm#i1564|
FatherDaniel Walker b. 22 Sep 1853, d. 7 May 1940
MotherNancy Jane Brown b. 7 Feb 1856, d. 21 Oct 1920
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     James William Walker was born on 20 April 1894. He married an unknown person on 5 January 1912. He died on 1 May 1962 at age 68. He was buried after 1 May 1962 at Evergreen Cemetery, Ft.Smith, Arkansas, United States.
Last Edited5 Apr 2004

Jenny Walker1

F, b. after February 1817
Jenny Walker|b. a Feb 1817|p79.htm#i279|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|Jacob Tussey|b. 1754|p77.htm#i186|Jane Shuff|b. 1772\nd. 1830|p67.htm#i187|
FatherEdward B. Walker Jr. b. 7 Sep 1795, d. 9 Apr 1860
MotherMahala Tussey b. 1802, d. 28 Dec 1842
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     Jenny Walker was born after February 1817 at Mulberry Gap, Tennessee, United States.
Last Edited26 Aug 2005

Citations

  1. [S271] Kimberly Mcdaniel, 2005.

John Walker

M, b. before 1603, d. between 1648 and 1671
ChartsTaylor Vitti's ancestors
Brendan Williams' Ancestors
     (1) Paula Evans, Rt. 2, Box 152, Hale Center, TX. Cites: (a)'Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island.' (2) 'The Great Migration Begins - Immigrants to New England 1620-1633,'by Robert Charles Anderson (NEHGS, Boston, MA, 1995) 3:1906-1908. Cites:(a) 'Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in NewEngland, 1628-1686,' ed. Nathaniel B. Shurtleff (Boston 1853-1854)1:212,368. (b) 'Records of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations..., 1636-1692,' ed. John Russell Bartlett (Providence1856-1865) 1:52,71,73,100. (c) 'The Early Records of the Town of Portsmouth' (Providence 1901) p.3,9,18, 421-423. (d) Portsmouth, RI LandEvidences 1:23,530. (e) 'Roxbury Land and Church Records,' 6th Report ofthe Boston Record Commissioners (Boston 1884) p.78,80. (f) 'The Original Lists of Persons of Quality...,' ed. John Camden Hotten (London 1874;rpt. 1974) p.278-279.

Birth: (2) By about 1603, based on estimated date of marriage. Marriage to Katherine __:
(1) (2) By about 1628.

Death: (1,2) Will dtd 18 Mar 1647/8.
(2) Portsmouth, RI. (2c) Will notrecorded until 16 Dec 1671. (2)
1633: Migrated from England. Settled in Roxbury, MA. (2)
John WALKER and William FREEBORNE followed the same migration sequence in New England, from Roxbury to Boston to Portsmouth. The FREEBORNEs were passengers in 1634 on the 'Francis' of Ipswich, probably from Essex or Suffolk. (2e)

Admitted to Roxbury Church as member #71, among a group who arrived in New England in 1633. (2a) 1634, 14 May: Freeman. (2) Bef. 1637: Moved to Boston, MA. (2a)

1637, 20 Nov: John WALKER was in the list of men to be disarmed as an adherent of Anne HUTCHINSON. He is placed near the end of the list not far from John COMPTON and William FREEBORN, who had arrived at Roxbury in 1634. None of these 3 men appears in Boston records, giving rise to the speculation that they had recently been drawn to Boston by the teachings of Anne HUTCHINSON, but had not had time to join the church, acquire land, or otherwise take part in town activities. Many of these men and their families, including William FREEBORN, went on to found Portsmouth,RI, in the following year. (2b)

1637/8, 7 Mar: Freeman at incorporation of Portsmouth, RI. (2) 1638: Moved to Portsmouth, RI. (2b,c) 1639, 30 Apr: Served on Portsmouth town council. The entry in the original record is damaged, and rendered in print as 'John WALL.' (2b,c)

1639/40, 10 Feb: Granted 100 acres at Portsmouth, RI. (2b)

1639/40, 12 Mar: Admitted as a member of the combined government of Portsmouth and Newport. (2c)

1640: Served on jury, Portsmouth, RI. (2c)

1647/8, 18 Mar: John WALKER of Portsmouth wrote his will. Named my wife Kathrine WALKER as sole executor. Gave to daughter Mary WALKER 20 acres of land at the upper end of my lot. Gave to my daughter SANDS 20acres of land beginning next to Mr. BROWNING's at the seaside and from thence up to the mill path, and there to butt against my daughter Mary's 20 acres, and if she die childless, then this 20 acres shall fall unto her husband James SANDS & his heirs. The work my son-in-law James SANDS is now doing he shall have the benefit of it as we have formerly agreed. My house with the land that is left shall be my wife's for her lifetime and after her decease to fall to my two daughters to be equally divided between them. My daughter Mary's land shall fall unto her at her marriage or at 20 years of age if she marry not before. Signed his will by mark.Wits. William FREEBORNE. (2d) 1656, 3 Dec: The proprietors of Portsmouth, RI ordered that William EARL and James SANDS shall have 50 acres of land, it being an old grantto John WALKER deceased. (2c) 1671, 16 Dec: Will recorded. John Walker was born before 1603. He married Katherine (?) circa 1628. John Walker died between 1648 and 1671 at Portsmouth, Newport, Rhode Island, United States.

Family

Katherine (?) b. c 1608
Marriage*He married Katherine (?) circa 1628. 
Children
Last Edited11 Sep 2004

John Walker1,2

M, b. 20 October 1801
John Walker|b. 20 Oct 1801|p79.htm#i1577|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|unknown Walker||p81.htm#i2578||||Frederick Horn||p42.htm#i192|Jane Horn (married name)||p42.htm#i193|
FatherEdward B. Walker Sr. b. 1756, d. 26 Aug 1838
MotherJane Horn b. 1771, d. bt 1849 - 1851
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     John Walker was born on 20 October 1801.
Last Edited28 Oct 2004

Citations

  1. [S52] James and Jane Walker, "Walker Family Tree notes."
  2. [S67] Robert L. Walker, Roots, Shoots, Fruits.

John Walker1

M, b. 1671, d. 10 October 1726
John Walker|b. 1671\nd. 10 Oct 1726|p79.htm#i1584||||Isabella Barclay||p8.htm#i1616|||||||||||||
MotherIsabella Barclay
     John Walker married Jane Staples.2 John Walker was born in 1671 at Donaghmore, Tyrone, Ireland.3 He died on 10 October 1726.

Family

Jane Staples b. 1674
Marriage*He married Jane Staples.2 
Last Edited8 Jan 2005

Citations

  1. [S235] Brent Fulgham, 2003.
  2. [S234] Johnny Bond Web Site.
  3. [S235] Brent Fulgham, 2003, Text: Peterson, Jeanne Walker; GENEALOGY: JOHN WALKER FROM IRELAND,
    Text: 1538 - 1969; Private Manuscript in the.

John Gilmore Walker1,2

M, b. 29 November 1834, d. 23 March 1928
John Gilmore Walker|b. 29 Nov 1834\nd. 23 Mar 1928|p79.htm#i274|Edward B. Walker Jr.|b. 7 Sep 1795\nd. 9 Apr 1860|p79.htm#i182|Mahala Tussey|b. 1802\nd. 28 Dec 1842|p77.htm#i183|Edward B. Walker Sr.|b. 1756\nd. 26 Aug 1838|p79.htm#i1973|Jane Horn|b. 1771\nd. bt 1849 - 1851|p42.htm#i185|Jacob Tussey|b. 1754|p77.htm#i186|Jane Shuff|b. 1772\nd. 1830|p67.htm#i187|
FatherEdward B. Walker Jr. b. 7 Sep 1795, d. 9 Apr 1860
MotherMahala Tussey b. 1802, d. 28 Dec 1842
ChartsEdward Walker Sr.'s descendants
     John Gilmore Walker was born on 29 November 1834 at Hancock, Tennessee, United States. He married an unknown person on 11 September 1856. He died on 23 March 1928 at age 93. He was buried after 23 March 1928 at Yadon Cemetery, Maynardsville, Tennessee, United States.
Last Edited26 Aug 2005

Citations

  1. [S95] Vernon K. Pogue Jr, et al Jim & Angela McArthur.
  2. [S271] Kimberly Mcdaniel, 2005.
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